Globasa Wiki
Advertisement

Globasa[]

Banwatu, fe ban deha, hay maxim meli femnini ki he banwatu okodo. Tesu matre lubi te, mas tesu daymatre maxmo lubi te. Tesu daymatre krea lile roso topi tas te, hu da iscu nini maxbono ki moyte name te Lile Roso Topi.

Once upon a time, in a certain village, there was the prettiest girl that was ever seen. Her mother loved her, but her grandmother loved her more. Her grandmother created a little red hat for her, which became the child so well that everyone called her Little Red Hat.

Un dina, tesu matre, hu da ja furno ban keke, loga te, "Am idi, misu azizuyen, ji oko kepul tesu daymamai duhisi, koski mi ore ki te daymo bimar. Am preporta keke ji hin lile kaxa fe buter tas te." Lile Roso Topi fori xoridi na idi cel tesu daymatre, hu da ogar fe alo deha. Durki te idi daw drevolar, te toncu haul, hu da daymo wole na yam te, mas no fale koski te jixi ki hay nere drevoyen. Haul swal tas Lile Roso Topi ki femte idido keloka. Nini, hu da no jixi ki is hataripul na restacu ji ore haul pala, loga, "Mi idi na oko misu daymamai ji preporta tas te keke ji lile kaxa fe buter of misu mamai." "Te ogar dayo teli?" haul swal. "Si," Lile Roso Topi jawabu, "to is ultra den bijadom ki yu oko denloka, fe unyum baytu fe deha." "Bo," haul loga, "mi xa idi na oko te pia. Mi xa idi hin dawo, ji am ixi den dawo, ji imi am oko kete unyum preata denloka."

One day, her mother, who just baked some cakes, told her, "Go, my dear, and see how your grandmamma is feeling, since I hear that she was very sick. Bring a cake and this little container of butter to her." Little Red Hat immediately left to go to her grandmother, who lived in another village. While she went through the forest, she met a wolf, who really wanted to eat her, but did not because he knew that there were woodsmen nearby. The wolf asked Little Red Hat where she was going. The child, who did not know that it was dangerous to stay and hear the wolf talk, said, "I am going to see my grandmamma and bring to her a cake and a little pot of butter from my mama." "Does she live very far?" asked the wolf. "Yes," answered Little Red Hat , "it is beyond that mill that you see there, at the first house in the village." "Well," said the wolf, "I will go to see her too. I will go this way, and you go that way, and let's see who arrives there first."

Haul xorucu na maximummo velosi pawbu, seleti maxmo nere dawo, ji lile nini seleti maxmo teli dawo, nun toncudu jozi, folo pepero, ji toncudu flura. haul xaner xorata fe baytu de daymatre. Te toke dwer, tok' tok'. "Hay kete?" "Tesu lilbete, Lile Roso Topi," haul jawabu, nun yongo tesu voka, "hu da preporta tas te keke ji lile kaxa fe buter ki beirsal fal misu mamai."

The wolf began to run as fast as possible, choosing the closer way, and the little child chose the longer way, gathering nuts, chasing butterflies, and gathering flowers. The wolf soon arrived at the grandmother's house. He knocked the door, knock knock. "Who's there?" "Your grandchild, Little Red Hat," answered the wolf, using her voice, "who brought you a cake and a little pot of butter that was sent by my mama."

Daymatre, hu da letacu in bistar koski te hisi lile bimar, loga haul, "Am pospel gumbo, ji wojutul xa idi cel super." haul pospel gumbo, ji dwer bukacu. Te nerecu cel daymatre ji velosi yam te, koski te no dupul yam fe max kom tiga dina. Te xaja klosi dwer ji idi cel in bistar de daymatre, nun intizarcu tas Lile Roso Topi, hu da xaja xorata ji toke dwer, tok' tok'. "Hay kete?" Lile Roso Topi, hu da ore voka de haul, hawfupul fe xora, mas nun fikir ki tesu daymatre bimar, jawabu, "Is mi, Lile Roso Topi, ji mi preporta tas te keke ji lile kaxa fe buter ki beirsal fal misu mamai." haul, hu da lilegi tesu voka, loga te, "Am pospel gumbo, ji wojutul xa idi cel super." Lile Roso Topi pospel gumbo, ji dwer bukacu. haul, hu da oko ki nini ata fe inya, sangocu cel bax tesu termokum ji loga, "Am plasi keke ki kaxa fe buter per mesa, ji ata cel in bistar ton mi." Lile Roso Topi ofplasi tesu topi ji idi cel in bistar, ji, surprisado fe okocu de daymatre cel in tesu bistar, loga, "Daymama, dento is dayo gebo ki yu hare!" "Dento is cel maxmo bono duweygebo yu, misu azizuyen." "Daymama, dento is dayo tui ki yu hare!" "Dento is cel maxmo bono dupawbu, misu azizuyen." "Daymama, dento is dayo ore ki yu hare!" "Dento is cel maxmo bono duore, misu azizuyen." "Daymama, dento is dayo denta ki yu hare!" "Dento is cel duyam yu." Ji, durki te loga den lexi, haul jeti se per Lile Roso Topi ji yam te.

The grandmother, who lay in bed because she felt a little sick, told the wolf, "Pull the rod, and the handle will go up." The wolf pulled the rod, and the door opened. He approached the grandmother and quickly ate her, since he has not eaten in more than three days. He then shut the door and went into the grandmother's bed, waiting for Little Red Hat, who then arrived and knocked the door, knock knock. "Who's there?" Little Red Hat, who heard the wolf's big voice, was afraid at the beginning, but thinking that her grandmather was sick, answered, "It's me, Little Red Hat, and I brought you a cake and a little pot of butter that was sent by my mama." The wolf, who softened his voice, told her, "Pull the rod, and the handle will go up." Little Red Hat pulled the rod, and the door opened. The wolf, who saw that the child came inside, hid under the blanket and said, "Put the cake and the pot of butter on the table, and come into bed with me." Little Red Hat took off her hat and went into the bed, and, surprised at the look of her grandmother under her blanket, said, "Grandma, those are big arms that you have!" "Those are for hugging you better, my dear." "Grandma, those are big legs you have!" "Those are for running better, my dear." "Grandma, those are big ears you have!" "Those are for hearing better, my dear." "Grandma, those are big teeth you have!" "Those are for eating you." And, while he said those words, the wolf threw himself upon Little Red Hat and ate her.

English (original)[]

Note[]

The text presented here was written by combining several renditions of the story included in the two links below. They are in the public domain.

Text[]

Once upon a time, there lived in a certain village a country girl, the prettiest creature that was ever seen. Her mother was excessively fond of her, and her grandmother doted on her much more. This good woman made for her a little red riding hood, which became the girl so extremely well that everybody called her Little Red Riding Hood.

One day her mother, who had just made some custards, said to her, "Go, my dear, and see how your grandmamma does, for I hear she has been very ill; carry her a custard and this little pot of butter." Little Red Riding Hood sets off immediately to go to her grandmother, who lived in another village. As she was going through the wood, she met with Gaffer Wolf, who had a very great mind to eat her up, but he dared not, because of some woodcutters hard by in the forest. He asked her where she was going. The poor child, who did not know that it was dangerous to stay and hear a wolf talk, said to him, "I am going to see my grandmamma and carry her a custard and a little pot of butter from my mama." "Does she live far off?" asked the Wolf. "Oh, yes," answered Little Red Riding Hood, "it is beyond that mill you see there, at the first house in the village." "Well," said the wolf, "and I'll go see her too. I'll go this way, and you go that, and we shall see who will be there soonest."

The Wolf began to run as fast as he could, taking the nearest way, and the little girl went by that farthest about, diverting herself in gathering nuts, running after butterflies, and making nosegays of such little flowers as she met with. The Wolf was not long before he got to the old woman's house. He knocked at the door, tap, tap. "Who's there?" "Your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood," replied the Wolf, counterfeiting her voice, "who has brought you a custard and a little pot of butter sent you by my mama."

The good grandmother, who was in bed because she was somewhat ill, cried out, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up." The Wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened, and then presently he fell upon the good woman, and ate her up in a moment, for it was above three days that he had not touched a bit. He then shut the door and went into the grandmother's bed, expecting Little Red Riding Hood, who came sometime afterwards and knocked at the door, tap, tap. "Who's there?" Little Red Riding Hood, hearing the big voice of the Wolf, was at first afraid, but believing her grandmother had got a cold, and was hoarse, answered, "'Tis your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood, who has brought you a custard and a little pot of butter, mama sends you." The Wolf cried out to her, softening his voice as much as he could, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up." Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin, and the door opened. The Wolf, seeing her come in, said to her, hiding himself under the bedclothes, "Put the custard and the pot of butter upon the stool, and come and lie down with me." Little Red Riding Hood undressed herself and went into bed, where, being greatly amazed to see how her grandmother looked in her nightclothes, said to her, "Grandmamma, what great arms you have got!" "That is the better to hug thee, my dear." "Grandmamma, what great legs you have got!" "That is to run the better, my child." "Grandmamma, what great ears you have got!" "That is to hear the better, my child." "Grandmamma, what great teeth you have got!" "That is to eat thee up." And, saying these words, this wicked Wolf fell upon Little Red Riding Hood, and ate her all up.

English (simplified)[]

Note[]

This is the simplified version of the story to facilitate translation.

Text[]

Once upon a time, in a certain village, there lived the prettiest girl that was ever seen. Her mother loved her, but her grandmother loved her more. Her grandmother made a little red hat for her, which became her so well that everyone called her Little Red Hat.

One day, her mother, who just made some cakes, told her, "Go, my dear, and see how your grandma is doing, since I hear she has been very sick. Bring her a cake and this little pot of butter." Little Red Hat immediately left to go to her grandmother, who lived in another village. As she went through the forest, she met a wolf who really wanted to eat her, but did not because he knew there were woodsmen nearby. He asked her where she was going. The poor girl, who did not know that it was dangerous to stay and hear a wolf talk, told him, "I am going to see my grandma and bring her a cake and a little pot of butter from my mama." "Does she live far away?" asked the wolf. "Yes," answered Little Red Hat , "it is beyond that mill you see there, at the first house in the village." "Well," said the wolf, "I will go see her too. I will go this way, and you go that way, and let's see who will get there first."

The wolf ran as fast as he could, taking the shorter way, and the little girl took the longer way, distracted with collecting nuts, chasing butterflies, and making bouquets with the flowers she picked. The wolf soon made it to the grandmother's house. He knocked the door, knock knock. "Who is it?" "Your grandchild, Little Red Hat," replied the wolf, imitating her voice, "who brought you a cake and a little pot of butter that was sent by my mama."

The grandmother, who lay in bed because she felt a little sick, told the wolf, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up." The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened. He approached the grandmother and ate her in no time, since he has not eaten in more than three days. Then, he shut the door and climbed into the grandmother's bed, waiting for Little Red Hat, who then arrived and knocked the door, knock knock. "Who is it?" Little Red Hat, who heard the big voice of the wolf, was afraid at first, but thinking her grandmather had a cold and was hoarse, answered, "It's me, Little Red Hat, and I brought you a cake and a little pot of butter from mama." The wolf, softening his voice, called out to her, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up." Little Red Hat pulled the bobbin, and the door opened. The wolf, who saw her come in, hid under the blanket and said, "Put the cake and the pot of butter on the table, and come to bed with me." Little Red Hat took off her hat and went into the bed, and, surprised at how her grandmother looked in her blanket, said, "Grandma, those are big arms you have!" "Those are for hugging you better, my dear." "Grandma, those are big legs you have!" "Those are for running better, my dear." "Grandma, those are big ears you have!" "Those are for hearing better, my dear." "Grandma, those are big teeth you have!" "Those are for eating you." And, saying these words, the wolf threw himself upon Little Red Hat and ate her.

Advertisement